Gentry Design

  • Gentry by Dean Wilson, Oakdale, Minnesota
Gentry by Jamie Zaroski, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada

<p>8 November 2007 </p><p> Hi, On Nov 2nd I had a sea trial for the Gentry that I built... the lakes will be freezing up very soon up here in Canada. It took me 8 months, I put a 4.3 liter Mercruiser in it and get a top speed of around 50 mph. I\'m planning to try out some different props to get a little more speed out of her. The boat performs very well and sounds great!! </p><p> thanks, </p><p> jamie zaroski</p><p> Thunder Bay, </p><p>Ontario, Canada </p><p> Dan Cruger </p>

Gentry by Dave MacKenzie

<p>Subject: Gentry</p><p> Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 </p><p> I built this 35 inch scale model as per your plans before starting the real thing. I have incorporated minor changes to the upper deck area only. Regards Dave MacKenzie</p>

Gentry by Jack Rouse

Building the Gentry by Jack Rouse

Gentry by Dean Wilson, Oakdale, Minnesota

Updated July 2012

Gentry by Daniel Blair, Edmonds, Washington

<p> We currently own a sail boat and do quite a bit of sailing around Seattle, the San Juan Islands and Canadian Gulf Islands. In 1999 my wife and I sailed our boat from Seattle to New Zealand spending 3 years living aboard. I have always loved boating but not always a sailor. I spent my childhood water skiing and racing around with flat bottom speed boats at the Delta in central California. </p><p> I had wanted to build a faster powerboat for some time and finally took the plunge in October 2009. I thought this would be a great project for my 7 year old son and me to take on. I was anticipating the boat to take about 1 year to build. As you can see from the pictures, I was set back about 4 months. </p><p> On January 20th, I had just finished sanding and filling the second layer of laminate with plans to purchase the 3rd and final laminate layer of Mahogany to finish the hull over the weekend. The last couple of pictures were taken about 20 minutes before the accident. </p><p> I had gone into our kitchen to and was talking with my wife when we heard a crunching sound down the street. I did not give it much attention. After a minute or so, my wife went out to take a look only to come back in to tell me that our nanny had run into the garage door (I am building the boat in our detached garage). In my mind, I imagined that I would now spend the weekend fixing or replacing the door. </p><p> I walked down to the shop and what I saw was well beyond what I could have imagined. As you can see from the pictures, the car had smashed through the garage door, hit the boat forcing it to spin around taking out the legs of my work benches and smashing the very heavy table saw up against the panel saw and the end of the garage. </p><p> I think that when our nanny had pulled her car up to the garage where she normally parks but did not put the car into park. When she took her foot off the brake and the car started to move forward, she stomped on the accelerator instead of the brake and plowed through the garage. </p><p> It is hard to see 4 months of work crushed, but it could have been a lot worse. We are fortunate that no one was hurt. I met with the insurance adjuster this week. We will be replacing the garage door (and will now get some windows on the top panel that we did not have before) and work on replacing the shop tools that were destroyed. I was not totally happy with my layout of the garage and this will give me an excuse to re-design. </p><p> I expect it to take about a month to get the garage back together and I am looking forward to restarting the boat. I can tell you that I will have a lot more confidence with the new boat having seen the two laminate layered hull take the impact it did and then smash through two work benches and crushing a 700 lb. full size cast iron table saw while staying relatively intact. It is obviously a strong design and construction method! </p><p> I appreciate all of your support. </p><p> Thanks! </p>

Gentry by Bill Brown, North Hartland, Vermont

<p>Photos Updated February 2013 </p><p> I think it looks pretty good. I find myself going out to the barn and start giggling, Everyone that comes by same reaction, like wow, look at that !!! Talk about stroke your ego. </p>

Gentry by John Rolfe, Casula, Australia

Updated January 2017 The reason I put the swim step on was so I could get into the boat when I am in the river. The material is solid Mahogany, the sides the same. The idea of the sides is back in the 60’s 70’s we raced skiffs and they had these side pieces wrapped around to help high speed cornering, so I thought I would incorporate as well. I have included a couple of pics of these Aussie racing skiffs. October, 2016 Here is what I am up to with the Gentry 17. I have completed 1 side, the finish timber is New Guinea Rosewood.

 

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