Frame #1 under construction

First attempt at making a steel boat, the Goliath

On June 26, 2015, in Builder Blogs, Glen-L Styles, Steel Construction, by aero_dan
7

OK, here goes… I bought the plans on 10 August of 2009. I drooled on and dreamed about them for five years (really? wow, I didn’t think it was that long…). I did months of research on engines, drives, motors, controllers, batteries, props, lighting themes, helm instrumentation, hull materials (wood, aluminium, steel), etc. I consulted […]

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Titan Tug to take to the waters of Georgia Strait

2

Latest additions to the Blog Installing the Battens using techniques from “Boatbuilding With Plywood” by Glen L. Witt A note on the blog notes; I’m building the blog notes – latest at the top, oldest at the bottom.  So if something doesn’t make sense, scroll down and pick the story up where it starts, then […]

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sanding-bd-brian

Sanding Board for Concave Curves

On June 18, 2015, in Shop Talk: Tips and Techniques, by Gayle Brantuk
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Brian Barbata in Hawaii is building a Glen-L Monte Carlo and shares with us today some modifications he made to his sanding board that he thinks make it more useful for getting into those pesky concave curves on classic runabouts. Adhesive paper of the size needed for these boards only comes in rolls, and not a […]

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Riviera-Bronkalla

Why Fiberglass A Boat?

On May 28, 2015, in Designer Articles, WebLetters, by Gayle Brantuk
2

The following article is excerpted from our book, “How to Fiberglass a Boat”.   It may seem self-evident why one should want to cover a boat with fiberglass. But the surprising thing is that many people do not realize the REAL reasons. Some just assume that it’s the thing to do because they’ve seen it […]

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VanIlTug - Router Scarfing Jig - 0090

Router Scarfing Jig

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There are probably thousands of ways to scarf two boards together, this is what I put together to use the materials and equipment I had at hand.  Everything, except the Plexiglas was from the scrap pile.  I started with the router that had a maximum extension of about 1¼”, so the baseplate needed to be […]

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